Baking Hermann
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Toum

Toum (the Arabic word for garlic), is a Lebanese garlic dip that is made by emulsifying garlic & oil into a delicious paste. The process is not too far from making mayonnaise, just instead of an egg yolk, it’s the properties of the garlic that emulsify it into a stable dip. It’s a test for the ultimate garlic lover and goes beautifully with grilled veg, crispy potatoes or just as a dip with charred flatbreads.
20 min

Toum is thought to have originated in Lebanon but is eaten throughout the Middle East. The word ‘toum’ itself translates to ‘garlic’ in Arabic, which is a testament to its key ingredient. Across the Middle East, garlic has long held a significant culinary place, not only for its flavour but also for its many health benefits including boosting the immune system and aiding digestion.

Traditionally, making Toum was a labor-intensive process, achieved by grinding garlic into a paste in a pestle & mortar and then slowly working in the oil and lemon juice. These days, a food processor is used in most kitchens. However, there is an easy hack to blend the toum in less than 60 seconds, which I am sharing in this recipe.

How to Fix a Broken Toum

If you’re emulsion breaks (the oil and garlic split), don’t worry. You can still save the batch. Simply follow the tip at the end of this recipe.

Ingredients

  • 1 garlic bulb (60g – 70g cloves)

  • 40ml lemon juice

  • 200 ml sunflower, rapeseed or olive (not extra-virgin) oil

Method

Peel all of the garlic. You can speed this up by soaking the cloves in boiling water for just 1 minute and draining them immediately. The peel will slide off easily. Cut each garlic clove in half and remove the germ with a small knife. Then cut the halves in half again to have smaller chunks of garlic.

Place the garlic into the jug of a hand mixer and add 1/2 tsp salt followed by the sunflower oil, lemon juice and 1 tbsp of cold water. With the hand blender positioned on the bottom of the jug, purée the garlic into a smooth paste without lifting the blender. It will automatically suck in small amounts of oil to emulsify with the garlic. After a couple of seconds, start lifting the blender minimally, only to allow a fraction more oil to stream in, then press it down again. Keep doing this to work in the rest of the oil until the emulsification is complete (you will notice the sound change). Then work in any of the garlic that hasn’t been blended yet. Your Toum should be as thick as mayonnaise. Scrape it into a bowl and serve.

What to do if your emulsion breaks? The easiest way to fix a broken emulsion is to transfer the ingredients to a tall jug and add 4 tbsp of aquafaba (the liquid in a tin of chickpeas). Now use an immersion blender to blend it all together. Within a few seconds, it should emulsify into a smooth sauce.

Toum

Toum (the Arabic word for garlic), is a Lebanese garlic dip that is made by emulsifying garlic & oil into a delicious paste. The process is not too far from making mayonnaise, just instead of an egg yolk, it’s the properties of the garlic that emulsify it into a stable dip. It’s a test for the ultimate garlic lover and goes beautifully with anything grilled.
5 from 1 vote
Active Time 15 minutes
Course dips
Cuisine Lebanese

Ingredients
  

  • 1 garlic bulb (60g - 70g cloves)
  • 40 ml lemon juice
  • 200 ml sunflower, rapeseed or olive (not extra-virgin) oil

Instructions
 

  • Peel all of the garlic. You can speed this up by soaking the cloves in boiling water for just 1 minute and draining them immediately. The peel will slide off easily. Cut each garlic clove in half and remove the germ with a small knife. Then cut the halves in half again to have smaller chunks of garlic.
  • Place the garlic into the jug of a hand mixer and add 1/2 tsp salt followed by the sunflower oil, lemon juice and 1 tbsp of cold water. With the hand blender positioned on the bottom of the jug, purée the garlic into a smooth paste without lifting the blender. It will automatically suck in small amounts of oil to emulsify with the garlic. After a couple of seconds, start lifting the blender minimally, only to allow a fraction more oil to stream in, then press it down again. Keep doing this to work in the rest of the oil until the emulsification is complete (you will notice the sound change). Then work in any of the garlic that hasn’t been blended yet. Your Toum should be as thick as mayonnaise. Scrape it into a bowl and serve.
  • What to do if your emulsion breaks? The easiest way to fix a broken emulsion is to transfer the ingredients to a tall jug and add 4 tbsp of aquafaba (the liquid in a tin of chickpeas). Now use an immersion blender to blend it all together. Within a few seconds, it should emulsify into a smooth sauce.

Notes

Storage: Keep refrigerated for 4 weeks.

Video

Print Recipe

 

 

6 Comments

  1. Dana

    5 stars
    Excellent! Thank you!!! This recipe is perfect.

    Reply
    • Julius Fiedler

      Wonderful! I’m glad you like it. 🙂

      Reply
  2. Anthony Hill

    Hi,

    Love your recipe and video. But, I’m doing something wrong. I’m using an imersion blender, 200ml canola oil, 70-72g of garlic, 1tsp salt. The first time I made it, it way WAY too salty. The 1nd time, I tried less salt, but I’d forgotten to take-out the germ, so it was bitter AND salty. This third time, I did remove the germ. This time, it broke, and the chick-pea hack didn’t work, so I added about a tsp of egg white, and it all came together.

    My main question, is the salt… I’ve tried table salt, sea salt, and kosher salt. Is toum SUPPOSED to be salty? The saltiness is actually masking the taste of the garlic.

    Please help

    Reply
    • Julius Fiedler

      Hi Anthony, this recipe asks for 1/2 tsp salt, not 1 tsp. Have you tried that yet? But even with 1 tsp, it shouldn’t be too salty. Toum should certainly not taste salty, but it should quite tangy from the lemon juice. But just use less salt next time until you’ve found the sweet spot for you! Just for reference, I usually calculate 7g per tsp / 3-4g per 1/2 tsp. Maybe weigh it out if you have a scale that allows it.

      And shame that the chickpea trick didn’t work. The liquid (aquafaba) has similar qualities to an egg white, so your solution was perfect!

      Reply
  3. Michael

    I made some toum after stumbling across your YouTube video, and i LOVE this recipe! It’s absolutely delicious. Do you happen to know to nutritional info of this recipe? Ie, Kcal and fat etc. Would be great to know this, so that i can incorporate as part of my daily meals.

    Reply
    • Julius Fiedler

      Unfortunately, I don’t calculate these yet on here. Will hopefully integrate it soon! I’m glad you liked it!

      Reply

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