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Peanut Spread

Peanut Spread

Transform your peanuts into a versatile spread that combines a whey-cheese-like richness with the mild flavour of raw peanuts. This delicious fusion makes for a perfect spread on bread but can also be used to garnish savoury dishes or even enrich desserts. It’s naturally soy-, gluten- and dairy-free.

Çiğ Köfte (Turkish Bulgur Balls)

Çiğ Köfte (Turkish Bulgur Balls)

Çiğ Köfte, also known as “raw meatballs,” is a tantalising Turkish dish that has captivated taste buds for centuries. Originating from the southeastern regions of Türkiye, this unique delicacy traditionally featured raw meat mixed with bulgur and a medley of spices. However, since the use of raw meat was banned by the Turkish Health Ministry, vendors started using bulgur and walnuts instead, turning Çiğ Köfte into a popular, naturally vegan street food.

Curry Leaves Ice Cubes

Curry Leaves Ice Cubes

Curry leaves, known for their distinctive aroma and robust flavour, are a staple ingredient in many Indian and Southeast Asian cuisines. These vibrant green leaves, often used fresh, add a unique depth and complexity to a variety of dishes, from curries and soups to chutneys and stir-fries. Rich in antioxidants and packed with essential nutrients, curry leaves not only enhance the taste of your meals but also offer numerous health benefits.

Kenyan Chapati

Kenyan Chapati

Kenyan Chapati are a beloved staple in Kenyan cuisine, renowned for their soft, flaky texture and rich flavour. This flatbread, with its origins in Indian cuisine, has been warmly embraced and adapted by Kenyan cooks, making it a common accompaniment to various dishes such as stews, curries, and vegetables. The preparation of chapati involves kneading dough made from wheat flour, water and oil, which is then rolled into thin layers and cooked on a hot griddle until golden brown.

Ndengu (Kenyan Mung Bean Curry)

Ndengu (Kenyan Mung Bean Curry)

Ndengu, also known as green grams or mung beans, is a cherished dish in Kenyan cuisine. This nutritious stew, rich in protein and fibre, is typically simmered with tomatoes, onions, garlic and an aromatic mix of spices. Often enjoyed with rice, Chapati or Ugali, Ndengu is a versatile and hearty meal and a staple in many Kenyan household.

Hazelnut Tofu (Hazelnut Dofu)

Hazelnut Tofu (Hazelnut Dofu)

Hazelnut goma dofu is a variation of traditional Japanese sesame tofu Goma Dofu, offering a rich, nutty flavour and a smooth, creamy texture. This dish combines the wholesome goodness of hazelnuts with the delicate, silky consistency of goma dofu, creating an irresistible fusion that makes a wonderful dessert.

Potaje de Garbanzos (Spanish Chickpea, Potato & Spinach Stew)

Potaje de Garbanzos (Spanish Chickpea, Potato & Spinach Stew)

Potaje de Garbanzos has its roots in Spain’s rural cuisine, where cheap and easily available ingredients were turned into a nourishing meal. The lack of expensive animal proteins meant that the dish was also suitable for religious fasting periods, which made it a popular staple during Lent. Over time, it reached the kitchens of all economic classes, where it began to transform into countless variations and became a symbol of home-cooked comfort food. It’s the kind of dish many remember fondly as the one their grandmother would prepare on a weekend. 

Coconut Milk (1 Ingredient)

Coconut Milk (1 Ingredient)

Making your own coconut milk from scratch might seem futile. After all, it’s easily available in cans in most stores. However, many brands use added thickeners and stabilisers to give the coconut milk a creamy texture that doesn’t separate, and even organic coconut milk is usually a messy concoction of water and softened pulp that is impossible to mix together. Plus, if you’ve ever tasted fresh coconut milk, you know that the shop-bought stuff is sadly nowhere near.

Ugali (Tanzanian Maize Meal)

Ugali (Tanzanian Maize Meal)

Across the African Great Lakes region, you’ll find versions of Ugali. Most parts of Tanzania and Kenya share the same name for it, while it’s known as Sadza in Zimbabwe. The Malawian version is called Nsima and was even added to the UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

Pani Walalu (Sri Lankan New Year Sweet)

Pani Walalu (Sri Lankan New Year Sweet)

Sinking your teeth into Pani Walalu is a textural delight as much as it is a flavourful sensation. Crispy and sweet on the outside, soft and slightly savoury on the inside, these fermented urad dal sweets are an unusual but extremely satisfying treat. They are traditionally prepared for Sri Lankan New Year, which is celebrated on the 13th and 14th of April. 

Tahdig-Inspired Crispy Saffron Rice

Tahdig-Inspired Crispy Saffron Rice

Tahdig is a culinary highlight of Persian cooking. Perfectly steamed rice made better by giving it an incredibly crispy bottom layer. Traditionally, it’s made with butter and/or yoghurt, but I’ve always been craving a naturally plant-based version of this crispy rice. When I recently discovered how most locals bloom saffron, it was the perfect opportunity to use up the infused saffron water and finally sharpen my tahdig skills with nothing else but olive oil.

How to Bloom Saffron

How to Bloom Saffron

Measured by weight, saffron is valued more than gold. It takes 75,000 blossoms to produce 1 pound of saffron, and each individual stigma needs to be picked by hand at the prime of its season. Add to the the intense aroma and flavour of saffron and it’s no surprise that it is often called the “king of spices.”

Rishta bil Adas (Lebanese Pasta & Lentil Soup)

Rishta bil Adas (Lebanese Pasta & Lentil Soup)

Pasta has long been a staple of Levantine cuisine, where it has found its way into rice and lentil dishes, and even desserts. It has the ability to lift a humble meal of lentils into a complete protein, and makes it incredibly fun to eat. Rishta bil Adas is one of these dishes. It’s a comforting lentil soup that gets its rich flavour from carefully caramelised onions, a few spices and fresh coriander. By cooking the lentils together in the same pan, they impart their hearty flavour and turn the liquid into a wholesome broth.

Keshek el Fouqara (Lebanese Bulgur Cheese)

Keshek el Fouqara (Lebanese Bulgur Cheese)

Keshek el Fouqara (literally “poor man’s cheese”) is an ancient Lebanese recipe developed by farmers who were too poor to afford a goat to make dairy products. Instead, they soaked and fermented bulgur until it developed cheese-like flavours. A popular recipe until around 50 years ago, it has gotten lost over the last decades. Time to revive it!

Any Legume Pancakes

Any Legume Pancakes

I’m determined that legumes need to play a more central role in our daily diet. They are a powerhouse, both nutritionally as well as in their contribution to nature (more on that below), and by simply choosing to eat them, we can support their diversity and those who grow them. These pancakes are an easy way to do exactly that. Because no matter which legumes you have access to, you can turn them into a savoury staple that can be flavoured in whichever way you like.

Xingren Doufu (Chinese Almond Tofu)

Xingren Doufu (Chinese Almond Tofu)

Despite being called “Almond Tofu”, Xingren Doufu is traditionally not made with almonds at all. The reason for this is a simple linguistic confusion. The mandarin words Xing Ren are commonly used to refer to both almonds and apricot kernels. And since apricot kernels have a similar flavour to almonds, Xingren Doufu is often called almond tofu.

Sprouted Legumes

Sprouted Legumes

Sprouting legumes is the easiest way to appreciate that they are in fact dormant seeds ready to burst into life. All it takes is a little care and attention and each legume is underway to essentially grow into its own plant. But sprouting has more benefits than a general appreciation for nature.

Adas Bil Hamod (Lebanese Lentil & Lemon Soup)

Adas Bil Hamod (Lebanese Lentil & Lemon Soup)

At first glance, the Lebanese Adas Bil Hamod appears to be a simple lentil soup. Already delicious by itself, it is transformed into something miraculous once a hot oil of sautéd garlic and dried mint is stirred through. Add to that the hearty broth in which the lentils were cooked as well as the tangy flavour of lemon juice and you find a healthy dish that’s rich in comfort.

Uttapam (Indian Rice & Lentil Pancakes)

Uttapam (Indian Rice & Lentil Pancakes)

Just like Idli and Dosa, Uttapam is made from a fermented batter of rice and lentils (urad dal). However, rather than steamed in trays or spread out thinly in a pan, it is fried into a thick, fluffy pancake and topped with aromatics like onion, chillis, tomatoes and coriander.

Chickpea Yogurt

Chickpea Yogurt

Making yogurt out of chickpeas does not quite sound like the dairy alternative we’ve all been hoping for. But it ticks a few important boxes. It’s soy- and nut-free, a natural source of protein and also probiotic. All of this makes a combination that’s not easy to come by on a plant-based diet.

Kuru Fasulye (White Bean Stew)

Kuru Fasulye (White Bean Stew)

Contrary to belief, the national dish of Turkey is not Kebab, Lahmacun or Menemen. Instead, many locals will name Kuru Fasulye, a fiery stew of white beans that have been slow-cooked in a rich tomato, pepper and chilli broth.

2 Ingredient Chocolate Mousse

2 Ingredient Chocolate Mousse

If you ever added a small amount of water to melted chocolate, you’ll have witnessed the unfortunate transformation from a luxurious texture to a stiff paste. The chocolate seized. There is, however, a way to add water to chocolate without it seizing. And what’s even more exciting is that you can use that method to turn the liquid chocolate into a rich mousse.

Biancomangiare

Biancomangiare

Using only a few key ingredients, Biancomangiare (translating to “eating white”) is a dessert of purity and elegance that shines a spotlight on one of Sicliy’s most prized treasures. Almonds.

Burger Buns

Burger Buns

I rarely ‘veganise’ food. Whenever I crave anything, there’s usually a plant-based alternative hidden in the culinary treasures of this world. You want to veganise pasta? Why not just try the many eggless pasta dishes of the South of Italy, for instance Lolli con Fave?

Coconut Chutney

Coconut Chutney

This Coconut Chutney is the ideal condiment to serve alongside Idli Sambar, a traditional South Indian breakfast. Dipping the fluffy idli into the soothing chutney, with bursts of nutty flavours from the tempered urad dal was one of the first experiences that convinced me of the ingenious way of Indian cooking, with its many layers of flavours and textures.

Idli Sambar with Coconut Chutney

Idli Sambar with Coconut Chutney

Idli are steamed fluffy rice cakes that are made from a fermented rice and lentil batter. A South Indian specialty, they are traditionally eaten for breakfast, but make a fantastic lunch or dinner, especially when paired with a sambar & coconut chutney.

Sambar (South Indian Lentil & Veg Stew)

Sambar (South Indian Lentil & Veg Stew)

Sambar is a quintessential South Indian dish that is often served alongside Idli. It’s a tangy and spicy lentil-based stew that is made with a variety of vegetables, tamarind juice, and a blend of aromatic spices that give it a distinct aroma and taste.

Castagnaccio (Tuscan Chestnut Cake)

Castagnaccio (Tuscan Chestnut Cake)

Amongst many other treasures, Tuscany is known for an abundance of chestnuts. Once considered a food of the poor, who foraged the fallen nuts in the forests, dried them and ground them into flour, chestnuts are nowadays considered somewhat of a luxury. And as such, this dessert has long conquered the heart of many Italians, while still remaining fairly unknown elsewhere.

Lolli con Fave (Pasta with Fava Beans)

Lolli con Fave (Pasta with Fava Beans)

This is a scrumptious example of the ingenious cooking of Cucina Povera, Italy’s kitchen of the poor. Thanks to a few simple techniques, it turns a humble assortment of veg, beans and freshly made pasta into a hearty and creamy one-pot dish.

Potato Starch

Potato Starch

Chances are that you have already extracted your own potato starch in the past, when you’ve made any form of potato pancake such as hash browns, Reibekuchen or latkes. Many recipes will direct you to use a cheesecloth and squeeze the coarsely grated potatoes as dry as possible to achieve a crispy finish.

Sesame Tofu (Goma Dofu)

Sesame Tofu (Goma Dofu)

Goma Dofu is often considered one of the pinnacles of Shojin Ryori. Traditionally, the sesame paste and kuzu starch would be ground by hand. It’s a process that takes several hours, but teaches the practicing monks virtuous values such as kansha, an appreciation for the very efforts it takes to produce these foods.

Vada Pav

Vada Pav

Fill a table with these and I shall commit gluttony. This popular food from Mumbai is one of my favourite examples of how the simplicity of street food delivers a complex culinary experience through layers of flavours and textures. The three different chutneys balance sweet, sour and spicy flavour notes that beautifully accompany the savoury potato patty, while the chura adds a satisfying crunch amidst the soft bun. It’s a symphony that begs to be repeated again and again.

Avocado Chocolate Mousse With Spun Sugar

Avocado Chocolate Mousse With Spun Sugar

Avocado might not be the secret ingredient you’re hoping for when thinking of a velvety, rich chocolate mousse. But since avocados are high in fat and, once ripened, also velvety smooth, they are indeed the perfect addition to a rich dessert. And don’t worry, you won’t actually taste the avocado. Win win.

Tembleque (Puerto Rican Coconut Pudding)

Tembleque (Puerto Rican Coconut Pudding)

Tembleque translates to wobbly, which does a good job a describing the visual texture, but doesn’t do justice to the velvety and creamy consistency of the dessert. Ever since I set out to discover traditional plant-based dishes from around the world, I’ve been surprised by how many naturally vegan options of popular everyday foods have long existed around us.

Coffee Grounds Chocolate Chip Cookies

Coffee Grounds Chocolate Chip Cookies

Every now and then, I shamelessly make three times this recipe and freeze the dough in smaller batches. Most Sundays are occasion enough to thaw a batch in the morning and bake it after lunch. Come afternoon, I am tucking into warm chocolate chip cookies, a mug of tea and a book by my side. Is there anything more satisfactory to be looking forward to each week?

Nori Chips

Nori Chips

If you’ve opened a pack of nori sheets in the past, chances are that you’ll have a few leftover. You, my friend, have are in luck because leftover nori sheets make one of the simplest yet most satisfying of all snacks. Chips. Healthy chips, if you keep an eye on the amount of oil you use.

Pane e Cazzilli

Pane e Cazzilli

Ask locals about traditional Palermo street food and Cazzilli will be high on the list. Also called Crocchè di Patate (potato croquettes), they are made from mashed potatoes, flavoured with pepper and mint and finally fried until golden and crispy.

Pane e Panelle

Pane e Panelle

When I travelled to Sicily to discover Italy’s traditional plant-based dishes for my series Vegan Cultures, Panelle was on the top of my list. It’s a popular street food in Palermo, but what surprised me was the use of chickpea flour to create thin chickpea fritters that are then served with a generous drizzle of lemon juice in a bread bun.

Rummaniyeh

Rummaniyeh

Rummaniyeh is a Palestinian aubergine and lentil stew that originated in Jaffa. When Palestinians fled historical Palestine, they took their culinary traditions with them, which is why Rummaniyeh is now often associated with Gaza.

Seaweed Salt

Seaweed Salt

Think about the amount of times you use salt. Now imagine adding a pinch of nutrients every time you use it. That’s exactly what this seaweed salt is all about. Despite seasoning your food, you’re boosting it with a range of minerals, antioxidants and vitamins.

Tahini

Tahini

Tahini is essentially made from just 1 ingredient: sesame seeds. It’s one of those key condiments that you should always have in your pantry. Mix with lemon juice, garlic, salt and water and you have a quick, but extremely rich and versatile sauce that will take your dishes to the next level.

Roasted Cabbage with Tahini & Zhough

Roasted Cabbage with Tahini & Zhough

This is my go-to recipe to use up leftover veg. Simply swap the cabbage for whatever you have lying around, roast it until golden and then serve it with the tahini, zhough and dukkah. It’s an unbeatable combination that will turn leftovers into a sensational lunch.

Dark Chocolate Energy Balls

Dark Chocolate Energy Balls

Combine most plant-based cupboard superfoods into one snack and you’ve got these Dark Chocolate Energy Balls. Plus, they are the perfect way to make use of any leftover juice or health-shot pulp by simply mixing it in. Zero waste!

Ginger & Turmeric Shots

Ginger & Turmeric Shots

Packed with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, ginger and turmeric are powerhouse ingredients known for their numerous health benefits. Whether you’re aiming to boost your immune system, enhance digestion, or simply add a burst of natural energy to your day, these vibrant shots are the perfect addition to your daily regimen. Plus, they are super easy to prepare.

Yachaejeon (Korean Vegetable Pancakes)

Yachaejeon (Korean Vegetable Pancakes)

Yachaejeon, a beloved Korean vegetable pancake, is a delightful dish that combines a variety of fresh, colorful vegetables in a crispy, savory batter. This popular Korean recipe is perfect for anyone seeking a delicious, easy-to-make meal that’s packed with flavour and nutrition. Yachaejeon is often enjoyed as an appetiser, side dish, or even a light main course. It’s also a great way to use up any leftover vegetables you might have in the fridge.

Tahini & Miso Instant Ramen

Tahini & Miso Instant Ramen

Tahini & Miso Instant Ramen is a delightful fusion of flavours that brings together the creamy richness of tahini and the savoury depth of miso. This quick and easy recipe transforms ordinary instant ramen into a slightly more complex snack or light meal, perfect for busy days.

Falafel Pita Sandwich

Falafel Pita Sandwich

The Falafel Pita Sandwich is a beloved Middle Eastern classic that combines crispy falafel with fresh vegetables, a rich tahini sauce and soft pita bread. This delicious and nutritious sandwich is perfect for anyone looking to enjoy a hearty, naturally plant-based meal. Packed with protein and fibre, falafel is made from ground chickpeas mixed with aromatic herbs and spices, then fried to golden perfection, before stuffed into the soft pita.

Any Legume Falafel

Any Legume Falafel

Falafel made from any legume is a versatile twist on the traditional Middle Eastern classic that is traditionally made from either chickpeas or fava beans. This approach allows you to create crispy falafel using pretty much any legume – from chickpeas to lentils or even green peas. That way, you can easily make use of leftovers or explore legumes that were grown locally.

Any Legume Tofu (Zero Waste)

Any Legume Tofu (Zero Waste)

Thanks to their protein and starches, it is possible to coagulate soaked and blended legumes into a Burmese-style tofu. My previous recipe involved straining the liquid before heating it, but this zero waste version allows you to make a tofu from pretty much any legume without straining. It therefore saves time and is even more nutritious as well.

Ginger & Chilli Chickpea Tofu

Ginger & Chilli Chickpea Tofu

Did you know that you can make tofu out of chickpeas? It’s inspired by Burmese tofu, which is made from a simple mix of chickpea flour, turmeric and water. When I’ve made this type of tofu with different legumes in the past, I always ended up with some leftover pulp. However, there’s no need strain chickpeas, which means it’s completely waste free. Plus, you can easily flavour the tofu any way you want by adding the aromatics straight to the blender.

Olive Oil Chocolate Babka

Olive Oil Chocolate Babka

Babka made with olive oil might sound odd at first, but it’s the secret to creating a plant-based version that’s entirely natural. No emulsifiers, no artificial flavourings. If you’re still worried, you don’t actually taste the olive oil in the end. It just does a wonderful job at creating a soft, enriched dough. The perfect base for layering it with a delicious chocolate filling.

Braised Wheat Gluten (Kao Fu 烤麩)

Braised Wheat Gluten (Kao Fu 烤麩)

Kao Fu, also known as Chinese braised wheat gluten, is a traditional Shanghainese dish that combines chewy wheat gluten with a flavorful mix of mushrooms, peanuts and wood ear fungus, all simmered in a savory, aromatic sauce. This classic dish is a staple in Chinese cuisine, celebrated for its unique texture and rich, umami flavors. Perfect as a main dish or a side, Kao Fu is often enjoyed during family gatherings and festive occasions.

Kartoffelsalat (German Potato Salad)

Kartoffelsalat (German Potato Salad)

A German Kartoffelsalat has to be schlonzig.

What does that mean? It’s a sensory mark of approval that properly cooked potatoes have been mixed with the correct amount of hot stock at the right temperature so that they soak up all of the flavours without turning into mush. When used for food, schlonzig describes an ideal consistency for a creamy starchy dish like risotto… or a potato salad.

Any Nut Butter

Any Nut Butter

Nuts are a daily part of my diet. At least once a day, often more. They are one of my main sources of protein, while also covering the often overlooked yet crucial intake of healthy fats. They strengthen your immune system, your brain health and even your vision. If you don’t fancy just munching on them, turning nuts into a nut butter is a brilliant hack to increase your intake.

How to Regrow Spring Onions

How to Regrow Spring Onions

This is possibly the easiest way to give your food waste another life cycle. Just by adding your spring onion trimmings to a glass of water, you can grow them again. And not only once, but for around four cycles!

Gochujang Pancakes

Gochujang Pancakes

If you’ve wondered what to do with the leftover veg that’s been accumulating in your fridge, I’d like to introduce you to Yachaejeon. In Korean, “yachae” means vegetable and “jeon” means pancake and it’s exactly that, a thin savoury vegetable pancake that is served with a lip-smacking dipping sauce.

Asparagus Chickpea Pancakes

Asparagus Chickpea Pancakes

For a sustainable vegan diet, we should learn from the cultures that have long embraced plant-based dishes into their culinary repertoire and apply that knowledge to what’s available around us. If we’re able to maintain a low carbon footprint while integrating locally grown soil-health-boosting plants like legumes into our diet, we can contribute to a much healthier cycle.

Banana Chocolate ‘Ice Cream’

Banana Chocolate ‘Ice Cream’

After a day of filming, this is usually the snack I sit down to. It’s so simple that I never considered turning it into a recipe, yet it is one of the most joyful things I make at home. In fact, I purposefully buy extra bananas just so I can gleefully watch them pass their prime. At this point, making the ice cream week after week becomes a selfless act of food preservation.

Crispy Rice Sandwich

Crispy Rice Sandwich

When a recipe calls for sticky rice, chances are that I will purposefully cook a little extra to have some leftover the next day. A bowl of rice sitting on the counter or the back of the fridge is just the excuse I need to turn it into these golden, crispy rice sandwiches that are a blank canvas for your favourite sarnie toppings.

Seaweed Salad

Seaweed Salad

The abundance of seaweed on coasts all around the world has always posed a crucial question. How come that certain cultures have long taken advantage of its nutritional benefits, whereas others have seen it as a mere weed of the ocean? What if we could learn from those cultures and apply a few simple techniques and methods to the local bounty, thereby opening up an entire new food group that is not only healthy but also sustainable?

Leftover Garlic, Onion & Herb Paste

Leftover Garlic, Onion & Herb Paste

One of my favourite ways to use up leftover aromatics and herbs is to blend them into a fragrant paste that can kickstart any mediterranean-styled dish. This works best with aromatics like onions and garlic, crunchy veg like celery or leftover stalks from cavolo nero, as well as mediterranean herbs like basil, parsley, chives, thyme & rosemary.

Cashew Ferment 2.0

Cashew Ferment 2.0

Consider this the evolution of the Cashew Ferment. Let’s call it Cashew Ferment 2.0. This time, we’re taking it a step further by shaping the fermented cashews into round cylinders and letting them age to a semi-firm, sliceable consistency.

Fruit Pearls

Fruit Pearls

With the help of agar flakes, a plant-based gelatine derived from seaweed, you can turn any strained fruit juice into semi-solid pearls, often called fruit caviar. It’s an easy way to dabble into molecular gastronomy and apply a form of spherification, where a liquid is turned into a tangible sphere. Fruit pearls make an excellent garnish on desserts and will add a pop of colour and subtle flavour.

Sprouted Lentils

Sprouted Lentils

Sprouting lentils is a gratifying process that any homecook should experience. The sheer excitement about an everyday dried staple blossoming into life with just a little care and attention is once again transformative. Dried lentils usually contain phytic acids, which are difficult to digest. But the germination process neutralises the acids and sprouts are safe to consume raw.

Potato Boba Tea

Potato Boba Tea

Did you know that you can make boba tea out of potatoes? Together with urban gardening legend Alessandro Vitale (@_spicymoustache_), we made our own potato starch from a handful of potatoes and used the leftover flesh to make potato milk.

Batch Cook Curry Ice Cubes

Batch Cook Curry Ice Cubes

Let there be no confusion. This is not an authentic curry. But many of you have asked for a simple and quick recipe that will make life in the kitchen easier. Which brings me to the giant ice cube hack. We’ve all been there. When you batch cook an entire meal, the freezer fills up pretty rapidly, bags go unlabelled, you forget to defrost them in time and veg turns mushy in the attempt.

Chilli Bean Noodles

Chilli Bean Noodles

The sole purpose of this noodle dish is to get you to try out Pixian Doubanjiang (Chilli Broad Bean Paste), a powerful condiment that should have a permanent spot in your pantry.

Creamy Hummus

Creamy Hummus

Hummus is one of my favourite spreads to make from scratch. It’s not only incredibly delicious, it’s also a rich source of protein and healthy fats thanks to the chickpeas and tahini.

Cashew Ferment

Cashew Ferment

This is not cheese. It’s not cream cheese. It’s not trying to be either. It is a creamy spread made out of fermented cashews. A cashew ferment. And while I agree that it might need a better name, to me it’s one of the most exciting foods I’ve shared on here.

Rice Paper Crisps

Rice Paper Crisps

If you’ve ever made spring or summer rolls, you’ve probably ended up with a few rice papers spare. A fun way of using them up is to turn them into giant rice paper crisps, by dropping them into hot oil for just a few seconds.

3 Garlic Hacks

3 Garlic Hacks

The humble garlic poses one of humankind’s greatest challenges. The more you use, the merrier. At least in most cases. Yet nature has cloaked it with a nifty defence that slows down the most willing chef. The first two hacks below will help you to not only speed up the peeling, but to dedicate some time to make it all worthwhile. Whenever you make a dish that requires a kick of garlic, it’ll only take the mere opening of the freezer to deliver plentiful.

Bread Buns

Bread Buns

When I decided to make Indian Vada Pav, the most difficult ingredient to find was not seedless tamarind, besan flour, or pure hing. It was the natural vegan bread buns that proved non-existent. So ultimately, I decided to bake them myself. And as so often, a decision made out of necessity led to a revelation for which I am now eternally grateful.

Pomegranate Molasses

Pomegranate Molasses

Once you’ve made something from scratch, you’ll never look at it at the same way. It’s transformative education. It decodes food labels and their ingredient lists, it qualifies price tags, it makes you appreciate, savour and cherish every bite more. The first time I truly felt this way, was when I baked a successful loaf of sourdough bread. You’ll never look back.

Sichuan-Style Brussels Sprouts on Crispy Rice

Sichuan-Style Brussels Sprouts on Crispy Rice

Once the last chimes of Christmas ring out, the fanfare around Brussels Sprouts usually quietens down too. But did you know that sprouts are actually in season until March? If anything, it is post Christmas, free from the need to blend them into a Christmas spread, that we can get out some of their boldest flavours.

Burmese Tofu & Tohu Thoke Salad

Burmese Tofu & Tohu Thoke Salad

Burmese Tofu (Shan Tofu) is a common food from the Shan minority in Burma (Myanmar) that is made with finely milled chickpea flour, turmeric and water. It is different to traditional Chinese tofu, which involves curdling soy milk and pressing the curds into a firm block. For Burmese tofu, the liquid is heated until it begins to coagulate and is then left to set into a soft block.

Jian Dui (Chinese Sesame Seed Balls)

Jian Dui (Chinese Sesame Seed Balls)

Jian Dui, Chinese Sesame Seed Balls, are a popular snack during Lunar New Year. They are crispy on the outside, light and slightly chewy on the inside and commonly filled with a sweet red bean paste. Once the dough is cooked in the oil, they begin to inflate and double in size, which symbolises good luck and prosperity for the year ahead.

Gudeg Jogja (Indonesian Jackfruit Stew)

Gudeg Jogja (Indonesian Jackfruit Stew)

Gudeg Jogja is an Indonesian jackfruit stew from the city of Yogyakarta. At the core of the dish is young, unripe jackfruit, which is slow-cooked together with palm sugar and coconut milk until all of the liquid has been absorbed.

Ribollita (Tuscan Bean, Bread & Vegetable Stew)

Ribollita (Tuscan Bean, Bread & Vegetable Stew)

Ribollita, Tuscany’s famous bread soup, dates back to the Middle Ages, when servants gathered leftover bread from the banquets of their superiors and combined it with vegetables into a nourishing meal. The name of the dish translates to ‘reboiled’.

Khoresh Bademjan (Persian Aubergine Stew)

Khoresh Bademjan (Persian Aubergine Stew)

Khoresh Bademjan is a comforting Persian aubergine stew that gets its distinctive flavours from the rich aroma of fried aubergines and tangy preserved black limes. Although it is traditionally made with meat, it is also common to use yellow split peas instead, turning this into a wholesome vegan option.

Besan Chilla (Indian Chickpea Pancake)

Besan Chilla (Indian Chickpea Pancake)

Besan is the Hindi word for gram flour (chickpea flour) and Chilla translates to pancake. It’s a popular North Indian breakfast, but it makes for a protein-rich, gluten-free and quick meal at any time of the day.

Kısır (Turkish Bulgur Salad)

Kısır (Turkish Bulgur Salad)

Here’s an easy yet wholesome dish that requires no cooking, comes together in under 30 minutes and is packed with flavour. Kisir, the Turkish Bulgur Salad, is in essence similar to a Tabbouleh. However, rather than a herb salad with a little bulgur, the bulk of Kisir consists of soaked fine bulgur which is then flavoured with a spicy red pepper paste alongside many other aromatic ingredients.

How to Temper Chocolate

How to Temper Chocolate

Knowing how to temper chocolate is a skilful way to level up your confectionary game. Properly tempered chocolate has a shiny finish and breaks with a satisfying snap, whereas chocolate that hasn’t been tempered looks dull, quickly melts in your hands and feels soft. Be it for coating pralines or creating festive chocolates with moulds, tempered chocolate will always show that a skilled hand has been at work.

Christmas Tabbouleh

Christmas Tabbouleh

This is not a traditional tabbouleh, but rather a tabbouleh-inspired salad to be served alongside the Pumpkin Kibbeh and Stuffed Grape Leaves for a festive Christmas spread. That way, it offers a bright and refreshing contrast to the heartier dishes.

Lebanese Pumpkin Kibbeh

Lebanese Pumpkin Kibbeh

This version of kibbeh combines the rich, earthy taste of pumpkin with bulgur wheat, onions and a blend of aromatic spices. The result is a savoury, golden-brown crust with a tender, spiced filling that’s perfect for a hearty meal or an impressive appetiser.

Lebanese Stuffed Grape Leaves (Warak Enab)

Lebanese Stuffed Grape Leaves (Warak Enab)

These Lebanese Stuffed Grape Leaves make a fun Christmas starter, served on individual plates with a drizzle of olive oil, or on a platter in the middle of the table. They are called Warak Enab, which literally translates to grape leaves, and are traditionally filled with either a mix of rice and meat or, like in this recipe, with rice and plenty of aromatics.

Calypso Bean Tofu

Calypso Bean Tofu

Burmese tofu is a common dish from the Shan minority in Burma (Myanmar) that is traditionally made with flour from split yellow lentils or chickpeas. It is different to traditional Chinese tofu, which is made by curdling soy milk and pressing the curds into a firm block. Instead, with Burmese tofu, the liquid is heated until it begins to coagulate and is then left to set into a soft block.

Salame di Cioccolato

Salame di Cioccolato

Salame di Cioccolato is a traditional dessert from Italy and Portugal that is actually more common during Easter, but its festive look also makes it a great occasion for Christmas. It is usually made with chocolate and butter, but I am using dried figs and a bit of olive oil instead, which helps to hold the salami together while also naturally sweetening it without the need for added sugar.

Pomegranate Kefir

Pomegranate Kefir

Just like sourdough or kombucha, making your own water kefir at home is a gift that keeps on giving. Once you have an active starter culture, it only takes a few minutes to make a new batch of kefir. The reward is a refreshing probiotic drink that is slightly tangy, mildly sweet and bursting with natural carbonation.

Sopas Mallorquinas

Sopas Mallorquinas

I recently travelled to Mallorca to find out what traditional vegan dishes are part of the local culture. The one that popped up on nearly every menu was Sopas Mallorquinas. It’s a rich vegetable soup that originated from the need to make use of whatever was currently growing in the garden, at a time when meat was not affordable or simply not available.

Pulled Mushroom Tacos

Pulled Mushroom Tacos

There is infinite joy in building your own taco, carefully lifting it up and biting into its many layers, all while trying not to drop anything from this delicate construction.

Mercimek Köftesi

Mercimek Köftesi

Mercimek Köftesi are naturally vegan lentil balls from Turkey that are made with a mix of red lentils and bulgur. They are different from the more common Çiğ Köfte, which are traditionally made with bulgur and raw meat or sometimes even only with bulgur. Besides the addition of lentils, Mercimek Köftesi also differ slightly in spices and method.

Harissa Spiced Tagliatelle & Puy Lentils

Harissa Spiced Tagliatelle & Puy Lentils

Pasta, in fact all carbs, have long gotten a bad rep. But the more I learn about food, the more I realise that carbs are not at fault here. In fact they too play a crucial role in a balanced diet as a source of energy. Rather, it’s the kind and quantity of carbs we consume that makes a difference.

Balsamic Pearls

Balsamic Pearls

With the help of agar flakes, a plant-based gelatin derived from seaweed, you can turn pretty much any liquid into semi-solid pearls. This works especially well with balsamic vinegar, giving each bite a pop of bright tanginess. It’s fine to use agar powder instead of flakes. Where I am, flakes are more accessible, but the powder will most likely dissolve better and you won’t need to soak or strain the liquid.

Farinata

Farinata

One of my favourite twists to making chickpea tofu is to turn it into farinata instead. Farinata is a thin chickpea pancake that originated in Genoa and is known in France as ‘socca’. Traditionally, it’s made from chickpea flour, but just like with the Burmese-styled tofu, you can start with whole, dried chickpeas.

Black Bean Tofu

Black Bean Tofu

Did you know that you can make tofu out of black beans? By extracting and heating the protein in legumes, you can change the protein bonds, causing them to firm up. Most of us have already experienced this process before when boiling an egg, turning the white from translucent to firm.

Butter Bean Stew with Roasted Fennel & Crispy Shallots

Butter Bean Stew with Roasted Fennel & Crispy Shallots

With shallots being available all year round, it’s easy to forget that they too are seasonal. And September is the month when British new season shallots kick into gear. So here we go! Shallots are also brilliant at adding complexity to a dish.

Hemp Seed Tofu

Hemp Seed Tofu

A quick word of caution. Homemade hemp seed tofu is not quite like soybean tofu. It makes a much denser and pastier tofu with a bitter flavour. Using the right amount of vinegar and seasoning it well before serving helps with the bitterness, but the texture is still very much a work in progress. Nonetheless, this tofu is an expression of what is possible with locally grown foods and takes some pressure of the much overused soybean.

Fruit Cheese

Fruit Cheese

I first came across fruit cheeses in Kylee Newton’s brilliant The Modern Preserver and this recipe is very much inspired by the methods described in her book. If you want to learn more about preserving food in its many flavoursome and creative ways, from jams to pickles and from vinegars to fruit cheeses, then let this book be a guiding hand in your kitchen.

Roasted Aubergine with Tahini & Leftover Herb Pesto

Roasted Aubergine with Tahini & Leftover Herb Pesto

One of summer’s delights is the availability of locally grown aubergines, in all their abnormal shapes and sizes, not adhering to commercial standard, but to nature’s guidance alone. The sight of these aubergines on a local farmer’s market beckons me to light up the barbecue and roast them whole, serving them with the simplest yet most powerful of all condiments, tahini and a homemade pesto.

Dijon Mustard

Dijon Mustard

There is a good reason why Dijon mustard first originated in the region of its namesake city. Here, Ancient Roman methods ensured that grapevines where grown alongside mustard, which would enrich the soil and provide essential nutrients such as phosphorus. The surplus of mustard seeds and the access to grapes and wine quickly led to the production of Dijon-style mustard.

Whipped Tofu

Whipped Tofu

Growing up in Germany, a great many weekends would start with a slice of bread, covered generously with quark followed by a spoonful of homemade strawberry jam. Quark is a type of dairy product that is almost like a very mild fresh cheese, if you imagined it strained, smoothened and instantly refrigerated. Its cold, soft texture makes it a refreshing base that perfectly carries a layer of jam. Rarely a weekend went by with my dad skipping this tradition and so it has forever burnt itself into my nostalgia of childhood.

Pasta alla Norma

Pasta alla Norma

There are few things as rewarding as making a homemade tomato sauce from scratch. The fragrance of the garlic gently frying in the oil, the scents of oregano and basil, the slow and satisfying blipping of the San Marzano tomatoes as they reduce. It is a process that encapsulates the joys of summer.

Fruit Leather

Fruit Leather

Fruit leather is an easy way to turn any leftover fruit into homemade (healthy) candy. By slowly evaporating all of the moisture, you are dehydrating and preserving the fruit.

Frozen Grape ‘Sorbet’

Frozen Grape ‘Sorbet’

This cheat’s sorbet is my favourite way to turn any fruit into a quick summer treat. It takes 1 ingredient and, once the fruit is frozen, it comes together in just 5 minutes. Unlike a sorbet, which is churned in an ice cream machine with a hefty amount of sugar to avoid the formation of ice crystals, this cheat’s sorbet only breaks down the frozen fruit, essentially creating a smoother & unsweetened granita.

Grilled Peach Panzanella

Grilled Peach Panzanella

There are few dishes as summery as a panzanella. Heirloom tomatoes, fragrant basil and, in this case, the sweet flavour of ripe peaches. This is by no means a traditional panzanella. Besides peaches, you also most likely wouldn’t find lentils in a Tuscan or Umbrian recipe, yet they do an amazing job at soaking up the dressing and juices of summer’s ripest fruits. Adding the grilled peaches adds an exciting contrast to the acidity of the tomatoes and the tangy dressing.

Potato Pão de Queijo

Potato Pão de Queijo

Pão de Queijo are small, gluten-free cheese breads from Brazil. Traditionally, they get their cheesy flavour not only from the addition of cheese, but also from the fermented starch, Polvilho Azedo, that is used to make them. Once we understand these ingredients, it becomes much easier to look around us and find alternatives that grow within our reach.

Black Sesame Seed Tahini

Black Sesame Seed Tahini

Black sesame seeds are not just white sesame seeds with the hull left on, they are actually a different variety. They have a rustic nutty, slightly bitter flavour that feels less rounded on the palette than the one of white seeds. From a health perspective, they are packed with more nutrients than their white counterparts.

Soybean Tofu

Soybean Tofu

Tofu is said to have originated in ancient China more than 2,000 years ago. Although the theories of its origin are debated, it is likely to have been an accidental discovery when a liquid consisting of soybeans was mixed with a coagulant such as acidity or calcium that would have caused the liquid to curdle.

Panelle

Panelle

One of my favourite ways to eat homemade chickpea tofu is this little twist. Panelle, in essence, is Burmese tofu spread out thinly and fried into crispy fritters. They are a traditional Sicilian street food from Palermo, where they are served in a bun with nothing else but a squeeze of lemon juice. Although not according to custom, I like to add a refreshing, tangy gremolata to cut through the textures and wake up the flavours.

Purple Pão de Queijo

Purple Pão de Queijo

Pão de Queijo is a traditional cheese bread from Brazil. The discovery of these breads dates back to the Portuguese colonisation of Brazil, when African slaves peeled, grated, soaked and dried local cassava roots to turn them into an edible flour. The flour, known as tapioca starch, is still used today in traditional Pão de Queijo recipes.

Mung Bean Jelly Noodles (Liang Fen 凉粉)

Mung Bean Jelly Noodles (Liang Fen 凉粉)

On a hot summer’s day, a bowl of cold Mung Bean Jelly Noodles (Liang Fen 凉粉) feels like a much-needed remedy to the heat. Many dishes are a product of their surroundings and these noodles, popular in the Northern parts of Sichuan, are a favourite to combat the humid hot climate. In essence, the noodles consist of 90% water. They are served fridge-cold in a simple, tangy broth with a gentle spiciness from the chilli oil and the characteristic tongue-numbing sensation of Sichuan pepper.

Hazelnut Iced Coffee

Hazelnut Iced Coffee

One of my fondest food memories in Italy was the discovery of the Nocciolino. It was in a small unassuming bar on a quiet street in Brindisi, where I first savoured the heavenly combination of an espresso with a scoop of hazelnut gelato. I had come to love affogato, a shot of espresso served with vanilla gelato, but the flavour of hazelnut together with a strong Italian caffè was unparalleled.

Green Pea Falafel

Green Pea Falafel

It feels curiously liberating to know that culinary classics like falafel can be made not just with chickpeas or fava beans, but in fact with most legumes. After all, most traditional dishes have always come from a place of necessity and availability, making use of what’s around but applying culinary wisdom that can be found in other parts of the world too.

Nettle Risotto

Nettle Risotto

Ever since I learned that you can eat nettles, I’ve been intrigued by their culinary potential. Here is a plant that grows plentiful wherever you go, but still rarely ends up on our plates. But as with many things that are easily accessible, we tend to hold off until a more convenient time… and so the seasons pass by.

Taiwanese Sesame Noodles

Taiwanese Sesame Noodles

These Sesame Noodles (Ma Jiang Mian) are a popular Taiwanese street food that are traditionally eaten cold amidst the hot and humid climate. In their simplicity, they achieve a perfect balance of sweet, tangy & nutty, creating a deep, rich and satisfying flavour that makes a perfect quick lunch. If you’re in a hurry, you can leave out the garlic and ginger, but taking the extra few minutes to peel and grate both into the sauce takes it to the next level.

Falafel

Falafel

Falafel has long conquered the culinary world as a flavoursome, naturally vegan, street food. By itself served with a simple tahini sauce, packed into a warm pita or served on salads, it makes a delicious showstopper of a meal. But as much as I loved having falafel out and about, I was never quite pleased when making it at home. It usually came out dense & dry, a texture that also seemed to drag the flavour of the herbs and spices into an inaccessible void. Over time, I’ve finally made a few changes that resulted in the crispiest and fluffiest falafel I have not only ever had at home, but that I have ever had, period.

Any Legume Tofu

Any Legume Tofu

Did you know that you can make tofu out of any legumes? Most legumes are high in protein (around 20% / 20g per 100g). By extracting and heating them, you can change the protein bonds, causing them to firm up. Most of us have already experienced this process before when boiling an egg, turning the white from translucent to firm.Although this works with any legume (chickpeas, lentils, beans…), it’s slightly different with soybeans, which are even higher in protein (around 40%). In fact, they have enough protein for it to curdle, which allows you to filter and press it into firm tofu. With other legumes, we only coagulate the liquid, giving it a soft Burmese-style texture.You can of course also add spices or herbs to the strained liquid. Once ready, make sure to fry it long enough to get crispy golden edges all around for maximum flavour. It’s brilliant as a soft tofu replacer but can be used for classics like panisse or panelle. Either way, you probably have some dried legumes sitting on your shelf begging you to give it a go.

Homemade Kombucha

Homemade Kombucha

Kombucha is quite a wondrous drink. It is naturally sparking, slightly tangy and mildly sweet. You can flavour it with the seasons, from elderflower to Tarocco oranges and use it as a refresher during the sunnier days or the base of a cocktail in front of a crackling fire in winter. If you make it at home, it is virtually bottomless. All it takes is tea, sugar, the flavour of your choice and nature’s most genius ingredient, time, to make a new batch.

One Minute Oat Milk

One Minute Oat Milk

If you remember in time, you can soak the oats overnight to soften them, allowing them to blend slightly better. If you intend to use the oat milk for coffee, add a small dash of oil, which will help to emulsify the strained oat liquid and water to froth up. You could also soak a few nuts like cashews together with the oats, which naturally contain plenty of oil and will do the trick.

Black Fungus

Black Fungus

Black fungus, also called cloud ear mushrooms, make an exceptional addition to a stir-fry and fragrant soup or can be served on their own as a starter. Their shape turn them into the perfect vessel to hold on to the lip-smacking spicy, garlicky and tangy dressing with black vinegar, soy sauce and plenty of coriander.

Vegan Sunday Roast

Vegan Sunday Roast

Not many arrivals in the veg world are as anticipated as the one of the British asparagus. As the first outside crop to be harvested each year in the UK, it truly celebrates the start of spring.

Vegan Saag Paneer

Vegan Saag Paneer

A vegan Saag Paneer, with a handful of wild garlic – my favourite way to use up the abundance of fresh spinach that spring brings along.

Chickpea Tofu

Chickpea Tofu

Burmese tofu is a common dish from the Shan minority in Burma (Myanmar) that is traditionally made with flour from split yellow lentils or chickpeas. It is different to traditional Chinese tofu, which is made by curdling soy milk and pressing the curds into a firm block.

Borscht

Borscht

This is my vegan version of Olia Hercules’ Borscht to support her and Alissa Timoshkina’s #CookForUkraine movement. Join the movement, raise awareness and show your support. Every bit helps.

Cavolo Nero & Marrowfat Pea Miso Spaghetti

Cavolo Nero & Marrowfat Pea Miso Spaghetti

This is my version of Jamie Oliver’s Super Green Spaghetti. When I cooked alongside him during a TikTok Live Event, he challenged me to create a plant-based version of his recipe.

Aquafaba Chocolate Mousse

Aquafaba Chocolate Mousse

Did you know you can use aquafaba (the cooking water left in a tin of chickpeas) just like egg whites? Mix it until stiff, fold in some melted chocolate and, voilà, you’ve got a super quick, plant-based mousse.

Ukrainian Pampushka

Ukrainian Pampushka

Ukrainian Pampushka are yeasted bread rolls that are traditionally served with borscht or turned into a sweet dessert. The savoury buns are often topped with a dill & garlic oil.

Bircher Müsli

Bircher Müsli

Bircher Müsli was introduced around 1900 by the Swiss physician Bircher-Benner. Back then, he served the Müsli as an easily digestible dinner to treat patients at his hospital in Zürich. Originally, it consisted of apples, nuts, oats, lemon juice and condensed milk.

Toum

Toum

Toum (the Arabic word for garlic), is a Lebanese garlic dip that is made by emulsifying garlic & oil into a delicious paste. The process is not too far from making mayonnaise, just instead of an egg yolk, it’s the properties of the garlic that emulsify it into a stable dip. It’s a test for the ultimate garlic lover and goes beautifully with grilled veg, crispy potatoes or just as a dip with charred flatbreads.

Biang Biang Noodles

Biang Biang Noodles

These noodles will single-handedly transform the way you look at homemade food. In their simplicity lies an enormous power to let a few aromatic ingredients shine and bring colour to a dish. It is said that they get their name, Biang Biang Noodles, from the sound it makes when the chef slaps the dough onto the worktop while stretching them out.

Tender Beans with Herbs & Tahini

Tender Beans with Herbs & Tahini

Cooked like this, these beans make a wonderful side, or add substance to a salad or soup, but I served them with a tangy herb dressing and a mustardy tahini sauce with dijon mustard and tahini. Very much inspired by Noor Murad’s wonderful green bean recipe in Ottolenghi’s Shelf Love (by the way a beautifully unconfined book to learn more about the art of layering flavours in true Ottolenghi style).

Slow-cooked Mushroom Ragù

Slow-cooked Mushroom Ragù

A vegan ragù with a rich sauce made from caramelised onions, slow cooked mushrooms, tinned cherry tomatoes and the gentle heat from a chipotle chilli.

Tahini & Miso Cheat’s Ramen

Tahini & Miso Cheat’s Ramen

This is an unapologetic cheat’s recipe. It is by no means an authentic ramen, nor an attempt to substitute tradition by cutting corners. It is merely called cheat’s ramen, because conceptually it gives an idea of what it’s closest to. The tahini, in its nutty richness, adds depth and substance to an aromatic broth that is flavoured and seasoned with white miso, brown sugar, soy sauce, chilli powder, garlic and ginger.

Cavolo Nero Pasta

Cavolo Nero Pasta

A vibrant green pasta sauce that makes a quick & delicious pasta sauce.

Roasted Shallots on Slow-Cooked Butter Beans

Roasted Shallots on Slow-Cooked Butter Beans

Why use five shallots where a single onion will do? You, like me, might have disregarded shallots as that tedious member of the onion family that is just too small to bother with. But what they lack in size, they give back in flavour.

Green Lentil & Swiss Chard Daal

Green Lentil & Swiss Chard Daal

Get ready for the the European Youth Event 2021 and join the sustainability cook-along. This daal is a versatile guide to seasonal cooking. Swap the chard for peas in spring, aubergines in summer and squash in winter. Use fresh tomatoes instead of tinned when they are in abundance and use local legumes instead of green lentils to reflect what’s around you.

Roasted Aubergine Focaccia Sandwich

Roasted Aubergine Focaccia Sandwich

What makes the ultimate sandwich? First there is the bread. On an all-natural diet, it’s pretty much gotta be homemade (or from your trusted local bakery). The Sourdough Focaccia is the perfect balance between a soft bun and a hearty Country Loaf.

Sourdough Focaccia

Sourdough Focaccia

Just like the Sourdough Rye Bread, the focaccia is one of the easier sourdough breads to make. As the rye, it is also baked in a dish, meaning that you skip the more challenging stages of shaping it by hand, letting it proof in a basket and then placing it into your casserole.

Sourdough Seeded Rye Bread

Sourdough Seeded Rye Bread

Being raised in Germany, whole-grain rye bread, or Vollkornbrot/Roggenbrot, has always been a common sight at local bakeries. But growing up a fussy eater, I’ve never given it the credit it deserves. Dark rye flour is rich in minerals, vitamins and fibre and gives a deep, nutty flavour to the entire loaf. Pair this with scrambled eggs & chives, or smoked salmon & dill, or cultured butter & homemade jam, and you’ll quite quickly find rye bread becoming a staple in your home. If you have your own sourdough starter, it’s also surprisingly easy to make yourself. I first learned how to bake this bread through the wonderful E5 Bakehouse in East London. After a few changes and simplifications (but still very much inspired by their reliable recipe), I now arrived at the formula for a bread that makes a daily appearance on my breakfast table.

Toum (Made With Food Processor)

Toum (Made With Food Processor)

Toum is a Middle Eastern garlic sauce that is made by emulsifying garlic, lemon juice, oil & salt. The process is not too far from making mayonnaise, but instead of an egg yolk, it’s the properties of the garlic that emulsify it into a stable dip. It’s a dream come true for the ultimate garlic lover and goes beautifully with grilled veg, crispy potatoes or just as a dip with charred flatbreads.

Sourdough Starter & Country Loaf

Sourdough Starter & Country Loaf

Learning to bake your own Sourdough Bread is a journey towards food mindfulness. Take away the water and salt and suddenly sourdough is made with just one ingredient. Flour. The rest is a fine balance of time, knowledge and skill.

5 Nut Butters

5 Nut Butters

Nuts are a daily part of my diet. At least once a day, often more. They are one of my main sources of protein, while also covering the often overlooked yet crucial intake of healthy fats. They strengthen your immune system, your brain health and even your vision. If you don’t fancy just munching on them, turning nuts into nut butter is a brilliant hack to increase your intake. Mix them into smoothies, cookie doughs or, frankly, just eat them by the spoonful.