Baking Hermann
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Ginger & Turmeric Shots

Ginger & turmeric shots are cleverly designed to deliver a dose of vitamins and beneficial compounds that can easily be absorbed by the body. For instance, the addition of black pepper means that the absorption of curcumin, a key active ingredient in turmeric, increases by 2000%. Equally, a small amount of extra virgin olive oil helps to digest these benefits of turmeric more easily.

I’ve always considered turmeric shots a recent marketing faff, the newest addition to the allures of a checkout amidst candy bars and scratch cards, but this time with a health promise.

But it’s yet another example of how I’ve been misled by the industry and the backlash it has received. Most ginger shots bought at the shops are overly sweet, designed to trick us into coming back for more. Yet in their sweetness, they defy the very health promise they set out to make in the first place.

However, in its original concept, a ginger & turmeric shot is cleverly designed to deliver a dose of vitamins and beneficial compounds that can easily be absorbed by the body. For instance, the addition of black pepper means that the absorption of curcumin, a key active ingredient in turmeric, increases by 2000%. Equally, a small amount of extra virgin olive oil helps to digest these benefits of turmeric more easily. Overall, it’s packed with vitamin C and plenty of anti-inflammatory ingredients.

Besides that, these are also ingredients that have a long history in traditional medicine. Both ginger and turmeric are two cornerstones in Ayurvedic medicine, helping to restore balance in the body.

So I decided to give these shots another go. It didn’t take long for me to realise that they are not meant to taste sweet. Since pretty much all of the fibre is removed, it is necessary to limit the number of simple carbohydrates (e.g. the sugar found in squeezed orange juice). Which also means that you won’t take these shots as a treat.

Many recipes use peeled ginger, but considering that the peel is edible and also packed with nutrients and that you are straining the pulp anyway, I simply leave it on. This makes this super quick and easy recipe that I now find myself making on repeat.

So what are some of the health benefits?

Turmeric

Turmeric is packed with curcumin, a potent compound known for its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. It can help combat inflammation, boost brain function, and potentially improve heart health. Including turmeric in health shots is a quick and easy way to tap into these health benefits.

Ginger

Ginger is a powerhouse, thanks to a special compound called gingerol. This little hero packs a punch with its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. It’s known to be a friend to our digestion, a soother of muscle pains, and a reliever of nausea. Plus, it might even lend a hand in keeping our hearts healthy and guarding against chronic illnesses. 

Lemon

They’re packed with vitamin C, which is a key player in boosting our immune system. The citric acid in lemons can help with digestion and detoxification. Plus, they’re a great source of antioxidants, which are known to combat cell damage. They also contain potassium, which is essential for heart health. 

Black pepper

Pepper contains a compound called piperine, known to enhance the absorption of curcumin, a key active ingredient in turmeric. Curcumin is poorly absorbed on its own, but when combined with piperine, its absorption can increase by up to 2000%.

So, when you add a dash of pepper to a dish with turmeric, you’re not only dialing up the flavor but also maximizing the health benefits of turmeric. 

Daily Intake

It is recommended to keep your daily intake within 30-60 ml.

Storage

A homemade ginger turmeric shot can typically be kept in the fridge for up to one week. To maintain the freshness and potency, store it in an airtight container or a glass bottle. Don’t forget to shake well before drinking, as ingredients may settle over time.

If you make a large batch and want to extend its shelf life, you can freeze daily doses of the ginger turmeric shot in ice cube trays. However, bear in mind that the health benefits wear down over time.

serves 8

Ingredients

  • 100g fresh organic ginger

  • 1 organic unwaxed orange (140g)

  • 1 organic unwaxed lemon (140g)

  • 1/2 tsp black peppercorns

  • 1 tsp extra virgin olive oil

  • 1 tsp ground turmeric

Method

Wash the ginger, orange and lemon well under water.

Roughly chop the ginger, quarter the orange and lemon. Then add them to the jug of a blender followed by the pepper, olive oil and 500 ml water. Blend as smooth as possible, then strain through a sieve and whisk in the turmeric before filtering it into 50 ml bottles. See tip for what to do with the pulp.

 

Storage: Keep in an airtight bottle in the fridge for up to 1 week.

Tip: Don’t waste the leftover pulp. You can turn it into these Dark Chocolate Energy Balls (coming soon!)

Ginger & Turmeric Shots

Ginger & turmeric shots are cleverly designed to deliver a dose of vitamins and beneficial compounds that can easily be absorbed by the body. For instance, the addition of black pepper means that the absorption of curcumin, a key active ingredient in turmeric, increases by 2000%. Equally, a small amount of extra virgin olive oil helps to digest these benefits of turmeric more easily.
4.50 from 2 votes
Total Time 15 minutes
Course Drinks
Servings 8

Ingredients
  

  • 100 g fresh organic ginger
  • 1 organic unwaxed orange 140g
  • 1 organic unwaxed lemon 140g
  • 1/2 tsp black peppercorns
  • 1 tsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp ground turmeric

Instructions
 

  • Wash the ginger, orange and lemon well under water.
  • Roughly chop the ginger, quarter the orange and lemon. Then add them to the jug of a blender followed by the pepper, olive oil and 500 ml water. Blend as smooth as possible, then strain through a sieve and whisk in the turmeric before filtering it into 50 ml bottles. See tip for what to do with the pulp.

Notes

Storage: Keep in airtight bottle in the fridge for up to 1 week.
Tip: Don’t waste the leftover pulp. You can turn it into these Dark Chocolate Energy Balls (coming soon!)
Print Recipe

7 Comments

  1. Trent Best

    5 stars
    Nice thank you! Where did you get the storage shot glasses?

    Reply
    • Julius Fiedler

      I got them on Wares of Knutsford.

      Reply
  2. Helen

    Your recipe lists turmeric but your nargis doesn’t mention adding it to the ingredients as you’re making it. Am I missing something?

    Reply
    • Julius Fiedler

      Thanks for making me aware, that was a mistake. I’ve updated it now. You can blend it together with all the other ingredients, but it tends to stain the blender. So I usually whisk it in afterwards ☺️

      Reply
  3. Eleftheria

    4 stars
    I made this 2 days ago and it is very good but today the mixture has coagulated. It doesn’t smell bad. I stored all of it in an airtight glass container in the fridge. Maybe this is normal??

    Reply
    • Julius Fiedler

      It has turned lumpy? If the mixture separated, that’s normal. But it shouldn’t coagulate/turn lumpy.

      Reply
      • Eleftheria

        Thank you!!

        Reply

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