Baking Hermann
Recipes

Harissa Spiced Tagliatelle & Puy Lentils

Pasta, in fact all carbs, have long gotten a bad rep. But the more I learn about food, the more I realise that carbs are not at fault here. In fact they too play a crucial role in a balanced diet as a source of energy. Rather, it’s the kind and quantity of carbs we consume that makes a difference.
40 min

One of my favourite ways to find a balance, is to replace some of the carbs with more fibre-rich food like lentils. Good-quality pre-cooked lentils (I use Merchant Gourmet) can easily be added to pasta dishes, stews and salads to give a meal a nutritional boost.

serves 2

Ingredients

  • 2 medium onions

  • 2 garlic cloves

  • 100g wholemeal tagliatelle

  • 1 pouch of precooked Puy Lentils (or 80g dried lentils cooked in advance)

  • 1 heaped tsp harissa

  • 1 heaped tbsp tomato purée

  • 30g parsley

Method

Bring some seasoned water to a boil. In the meantime, peel and slice the onions. Heat some extra-virgin olive oil in a large frying pan and fry the onions with 1/2 tsp salt on medium heat until they begin to turn golden. When the water is boiling, break the pasta into pieces directly into the pan and cook for 1 min less than instructed.

While the pasta is cooking, peel the garlic cloves and grate them into the pan with the onions. Continue cooking for a minute until the garlic smells aromatic, then add the harissa and tomato paste followed by a ladle of pasta water to break the frying and loosen the sauce.

Remove the tougher stems of the parsley and roughly chop the leafy part. When the pasta is ready, use a slotted spoon to lift the tagliatelle pieces straight into the frying pan. Taste for seasoning and add a little more pasta water (to add salt) or just warm water and let the pasta finish cooking in the sauce for the last minute. Add the lentils and mix through to warm up. Then stir in most of the parsley.

Divide the dish over two plates and top with the remaining parsley and a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil.

Harissa Spiced Tagliatelle & Puy Lentils

Pasta, in fact all carbs, have long gotten a bad rep. But the more I learn about food, the more I realise that carbs are not at fault here. In fact they too play a crucial role in a balanced diet as a source of energy. Rather, it’s the kind and quantity of carbs we consume that makes a difference.
5 from 1 vote
Active Time 10 minutes
Course Main Course
Servings 2

Ingredients
  

  • 2 medium onions
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 100 g wholemeal tagliatelle
  • 1 pouch precooked Puy Lentils (or 80g dried lentils cooked in advance)
  • 1 heaped tsp harissa
  • 1 heaped tbsp tomato purée
  • 30 g parsley

Instructions
 

  • Bring some seasoned water to a boil. In the meantime, peel and slice the onions. Heat some extra-virgin olive oil in a large frying pan and fry the onions with 1/2 tsp salt on medium heat until they begin to turn golden. When the water is boiling, break the pasta into pieces directly into the pan and cook for 1 min less than instructed.
  • While the pasta is cooking, peel the garlic cloves and grate them into the pan with the onions. Continue cooking for a minute until the garlic smells aromatic, then add the harissa and tomato paste followed by a ladle of pasta water to break the frying and loosen the sauce.
  • Remove the tougher stems of the parsley and roughly chop the leafy part. When the pasta is ready, use a slotted spoon to lift the tagliatelle pieces straight into the frying pan. Taste for seasoning and add a little more pasta water (to add salt) or just warm water and let the pasta finish cooking in the sauce for the last minute. Add the lentils and mix through to warm up. Then stir in most of the parsley.
  • Divide the dish over two plates and top with the remaining parsley and a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil.
Print Recipe

4 Comments

  1. Katja Ryffel

    5 stars
    I absolutely love this recipe! It’s quick, easy and super tasty ❤ And the new site is perfect! Thank you!

    Reply
    • Julius Fiedler

      Thanks for the kind words!

      Reply
  2. Laree Payne

    Hi there,
    How many grams is the pre-cooked puy lentil pouch? I don’t think we have these in New Zealand so I will cook them and then add.
    Thank you!
    Laree

    Reply
    • Julius Fiedler

      Great question, you can use 80-100g dried lentils instead. I’ll update the recipe. Thanks for checking.

      Reply

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